Addendum To Department Of Army Rotation Agreements

The claimants allege that the United States breached its contract by limiting staff to a single extension, in accordance with draft sub-chapter 1230. They argue that, when signing their rotation agreement, they did so with the conviction that the 1981 version of the rule would still apply and that they could therefore benefit from an unlimited number of extensions as long as their performance was satisfactory. They also argue that the United States is required to act in good faith in its treaties with citizens and should therefore apply the 1981 version of the rule. [4] Rotation agreements vary slightly from one department of the DOD to another. Under the rule, the DOD required civilian staff to sign rotation agreements before working abroad, as did the above-mentioned applicants and most members of ODERAG. [4] The rotation agreements provide that employees who wish to continue working for DOD upon their return to the United States must either exercise their right of return if they still have it, or enroll in the Priority Placement Program (PPP). In short, the plaintiffs bring the nature of the classic challenge to the legality of administrative rules, here draft sub-chapter 1230, which was recognized and sanctioned by our Court of * 7 Appeals in National Treasury Employees Union v. Devine, 577 F. Supp. 738, 745 (D.D.C.1983), aff`d 733 F.2d 114 (D.C Cir. 1984).

The applicants do not challenge personnel decisions taken in individual cases and, in fact, the appeal does not contain any allegation of transfer or transfer. As the applicants stated in their opposition, “there is no dispute between an employee and a supervisor and there is no remedy that can be sought under the CSRA through a complaint filed with the Office of Special Counsel”. Pl.`s Opp`n with 26 DoD created PPP in the 1970s to find new positions for civilians returning from overseas personnel who had lost the right to return to their previous positions and for employees whose rank had increased during their time abroad and who therefore decided not to return to their previous and inferior positions. Under the PPP, employees returning to the U.S. choose a geographic area in the U.S. where they want to work. If they do not have a DOD job posting with the same seniority, status, and mandate (even if it is not necessarily the same position) that was maintained in that geographic area prior to their employment abroad, they must expand the area in which they are willing to accept employment. . . .